<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2619149828102266&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Why Your MCAT Score is Stagnating: Passive vs Active Learning
Posted by Kevin Wang

Over the course of any student’s MCAT studying journey, they might see that their score has stopped improving, or no matter what, they can’t seem to remember certain content areas. If you find yourself in this situation, you may want to reevaluate how you’re studying—are you passively or actively learning?

COVID-19 MCAT Changes: Shorter Exam in 2020
Posted by Kevin Wang

With all MCAT exams in 2020 being substantially shortened until the end of the year, you might find yourself wondering how to properly prepare for the new exam. If you aren’t familiar with the changes yet, here they are in a nutshell:

  • C/P, B/B, and P/S have all been shortened from 59 questions in 95 minutes to 48 questions in 76 minutes.
  • CARS has been shortened from 53 questions in 90 minutes to 48 questions in 81 minutes.
  • The lunch break has also been removed so every break between sections will now be 10 minutes. 
Everything to Consider Before Taking an MCAT Review Course
Posted by Kevin Wang

As you begin studying for the MCAT, you might consider taking an MCAT review course. While these courses have their merits, many students who have taken such courses end up feeling like they didn’t really gain much from it.

If you are currently taking an MCAT course or are considering doing so, here are some tips to help you assess your next best steps and how to make the most of a course should you choose to take one.

Free MCAT Study Schedule — 30 Days To Test Day
Posted by Kevin Wang

One of MST’s newest resources is the “30 Days to MCAT Test Day Sample Schedule.” If you’re just starting your MCAT prep, you might wonder what that schedule is, and why it is built the way it is. We hope that this blog makes everything a little more clear.

What Are My Options If I Failed the MCAT?
Posted by Kevin Wang

One of the most helpless feelings a student applying to medical school can experience is bombing their MCAT—there’s no doubt about that. After months of hard work, you may feel like you’ve lost any chance at getting into medical school.

Although it is true that a low MCAT score will negatively impact your application, there are still many things you can do to make sure you can still be a competitive applicant. The first thing you should consider is if you really “failed” the MCAT.

5 Tips for a Strong MCAT Test Day
Posted by Kevin Wang

As test day approaches, you may find yourself wondering if there is anything else you can do to ensure your exam goes smoothly. While studying far in advance is a no brainer, there are some easy things you can do to make sure you don’t encounter any issue on test day, and just make your life a little bit easier. 

First things first: Don't wait until the night before the exam to start thinking about these things. If you establish strong habits in the weeks leading up to the exam, your future self will be grateful for that extra bit of intention come test day. Where to start?

Thinking about voiding your MCAT? Here's what you should know.
Posted by Kevin Wang

As test day approaches, you may be considering the idea of voiding your exam afterwards. While there are real reasons for voiding your MCAT exam, it’s important to know when voiding is the correct choice.

After finishing every section on the MCAT, you are given the option to void your exam. If you choose to do so, then your exam will be wiped and there will be no record of taking it. This can be risky, as it may delay your medical school application and cause you to continue studying. Still, there are times when voiding the MCAT is the right decision. 

When Should I Start Studying for the MCAT?
Posted by Kevin Wang

If you're planning to attend medical school, one of the questions that might be on your mind is when exactly you should start to prepare for the MCAT. This is tied to when you should take the MCAT, but can vary widely by student.

To ensure you're making the best decision for your timeline and goals, you'll want to look at the factors that are unique to you. I find it's most helpful to use the following questions in order to determine when it's best for you to start studying for the MCAT:

careers med school tutors