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Dealing with the Loss of a Co-Worker
Posted by Michael Stephens

He was one of the friendliest people at my medical school. He dressed in a business suit to “coach” our intramural teams when we played against Law, or Dental, or Pharmacy school. He offered an empathetic ear to classmates who failed Step 1. And he sat with me at the dinner before the night I interviewed for medical school, after I got to the restaurant 30 minutes late. A friend of his joined us at a table off to side of the main group. They talked college football with me for a few hours, and they helped calm my nervous anticipation of the next day. I bumped into him a few times downtown—strangely, always at ice cream shops—and he always met me with a big smile and an enthusiastic “Hey, man! How are you?!” Even through our few interactions, he helped make medical school a friendlier place. He did the same for many others.

Scheduling Step 1 After a Med School Leave of Absence
Posted by Michael Stephens

Everyone has their own path through medical school, and for many, that includes taking time off for reasons that may be personal, professional, or both. It’s important upfront to acknowledge that this is perfectly acceptable. Medical education and training is long and challenging, and life outside of medicine for many people may require that you take a break from your studying and learning. If this break happens to occur shortly before or during your study period for Step 1, it can be challenging to determine how to go about diving back not only into medical school but also your preparation for Step 1. This post will help you navigate the considerations that go into this.

Making the Most of a Leave of Absence from Medical School
Posted by Michael Stephens

Medical school is a challenging road that requires sacrifice and dedication. However, life outside of medicine does not stop in the course of your training and sometimes will necessitate taking time away for reasons that may be personal, professional, or both. When you decide to take a leave of absence from your curriculum, you may be unsure of how best to utilize your time; while there is no single right answer to this question, this article will outline some suggestions.

Your USMLE Step 3 Study Plan
Posted by Michael Stephens

“Two months for Step 1, two weeks for Step 2 CK, and a number 2 pencil for Step 3, right?” Not exactly.

You cannot bring your own pencils into the testing facility nor would you need them. And more importantly, Step 3, though not the most crucial of the three USMLE examinations, is not an exam to disregard. It is an expensive and grueling exam that you would only wish to have to take once and is being increasingly used in the fellowship match. This outline will breakdown how to plan for the exam and what to expect as you prepare and take the test.

How to Finalize Your Residency Application Plan
Posted by Michael Stephens

Sending off ERAS can be a simultaneously nerve-wracking and exhilarating experience. In the days leading up to submission, there are a few steps you can proactively take before finalization to avoid any application mishaps.

Best Tips and Step 2 Resources for Your Neurology Rotation
Posted by Michael Stephens

Don't rack your brain figuring out how to shine on your neurology rotation and prepare for the neurology shelf. These high-yield Step 2 resources will help you both maximize your performance and minimize any headache in the process.

The 5 Best Step 2 Resources for the ObGyn Shelf
Posted by Michael Stephens

Most students enjoy their obstetrics and gynecology rotation because it offers a unique mix of surgery, clinic, and labor and delivery wards. However, for these same reasons, the obstetrics and gynecology NBME subject exam can be challenging. The following resources can help you prepare for this exam.

The Best Step 2 Resources to Use While on Family Medicine Rotation
Posted by Michael Stephens

The family medicine rotation is a summative experience that incorporates components of outpatient medicine from many other specialties including internal medicine, pediatrics, and OB/GYN. As a result, you can readily align your preparation for this clerkship and the shelf with how you would prepare for Step 2 CK. Furthermore, because this rotation often affords the ability to study during your nights and weekends, you should have plenty of time to shine on the clerkship and still rock the shelf exam and ultimately your Step 2 CK. We'll show precisely how to do so here.

How to Choose Where to Apply to Residency
Posted by Michael Stephens

Choosing where to apply for medical residency is an important decision and should be handled with contemplation and reflection. While you are permitted to apply to as many programs as you would like with your single ERAS application, this can make submission unnecessarily expensive; furthermore, some committees may expect personal statements or secondary essays tailored to why you are applying to their programs. For this reason, it is better to be honest with yourself about where you would like to and realistically can train and tailor your list accordingly.

How to Change Your Medical Specialty Late in the Game
Posted by Michael Stephens

Choosing a specialty is one of the most challenging aspects of medical school. While it’s not an irreversible decision and many people do change their specialties after matching, the process in doing so can be complicated and is best avoided. Nevertheless, if you realize that your path through medical school is leading you to a different area in medicine than the one you had initially been considering, these tips can help you sort through the logistics of making the switch and readying your application.

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