<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=2619149828102266&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">
Get Tutoring
close-button
sidebar image
Schedule your free phone consult.

The second year of medical school (MS2) is an exciting time. Most students will have completed the more basic science courses like biochemistry and physiology and move on to more clinical material such as pathology and pharmacology. For this reason, the second year of medical school can be a time for immense academic growth. However, at many institutions, the second year curriculum is even more intense and rigorous than the first year. For these reasons, maintaining a good work-life balance and reducing stress are especially important as an MS2. The following tips can help you to prevent burnout during the second year of medical school.

1. Get organized.

Because time is so limited as an MS2, being organized can go a long way in helping students to feel more prepared and less stressed. Have a calendar to record all important dates and deadlines such as days of exams or student organization meetings. If certain classes are mandatory, be sure to mark those on your calendar as well so that you never forget about them and suddenly find yourself rushing to lecture. It can also be helpful to arrange some of your extracurricular activities such as volunteering, any clinical assignments, or meetings with your professor well before exam weeks. It is also important to have an organized way to learn and study the lecture material. For example, maybe you decide to make separate folders on your desktop or google drive to save each of the lectures for each course along with any notes or handouts you are given. Repetition is key for learning material in medical school, so by organizing your lecture material in a way that is easiest for you, you will be more likely to solidly learn all the lectures and not forget to study any material.

2. Plan your vacations.

The sheer volume of material can make MS2 daunting, and the amount of studying can make it difficult to have a lot of time off. If you have friends and family out of state, you probably won’t be seeing them every weekend. Even if your family is close by, much of your free time will be devoted to learning medicine. For this reason, it is important to make the most of the free time you do have. Planning vacations during this time can be a great way to reduce stress and give you something to look forward to. As a first year medical student, I took a trip to Italy over the December break to visit family, and as a second year medical student, I spent my spring break exploring Costa Rica. On post exam weekends, I tried to spend more time with my friends outside of medicine, catch up on sleep, or plan short getaways.

3. Do something fun every day!

One of the best ways to prevent burnout is to make sure your life is not all about medicine. It can be easy to spend all day in lecture, spend all night studying, and repeat for many days without taking time to do something fun that you enjoy. It’s entirely possible to still pursue some of your non-medical interests while in MS2, but it is about balance. Push yourself to be more productive in the afternoon so that you can have dinner with a friend or go to the gym in the evening. Try to take at least one night off from studying each weekend to let yourself relax and unwind. Remembering to make time for yourself will not only make you happier and healthier but will probably help you perform better in medical school as well.

Overall, MS2 is a great year. In reality, it is a time in which students often note one of their biggest educational growths. However, it is important to prevent burnout by staying organized, having fun, and taking care of yourself.

New call-to-action
Lauryn Falcone

Lauryn Falcone

Lauryn Falcone graduated Summa Cum Laude and as co-valedictorian from Rollins College before pursuing an MD/PhD degree at West Virginia University School of Medicine. She is currently working towards a PhD in cellular and integrative physiology at the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in a respiratory toxicology laboratory. Lauryn completed her first two years of medical school as an honors student, scoring a 254 on the USMLE Step 1 examination and achieving above the 90th percentile on eight NBME shelf exams. Lauryn has a strong passion for tutoring and mentoring students and enjoys helping them navigate the challenges of medical school.
Learn More